Tag: MDA

What Operators Need to Know About Their Master Distribution Agreement

A food and beverage procurement strategy usually centers around a Master Distribution Agreement (MDA). These contracts are central to managing costs and quality and enable the operator to focus on running the restaurant rather than tracking price fluctuations and bidding products.

What Is a Master Distribution Agreement?

As a one-stop-shop for restaurants, broadline distributors offer thousands of products, sometimes as many as 15,000. The immense size of their sales and volume of goods means that they can offer their clients volume discounts and pricing incentives.

Specialty suppliers, on the other hand, represent a limited number of product lines and operate within a particular industry niche. They often specialize in hard-to-find items or locally sourced products.

So, where does the Master Distribution Agreement fit into this distribution scheme?

A Master Distribution Agreement (MDA) is an agreement between an operator and their main broadline distributor. These broadline distributors function as the go-between for foodservice operatorsand the food manufacturers. A typical MDA requires at least 80% of a restaurant’s purchases to be made from the broadline distributor.

Without this important contract, operators are missing out on locking in pricing terms and avoiding extreme cost swings.

How Do Operators Get the Most Out of a MDA?

Like any contract, details found within these agreements can weigh in favor of the distributor or the operator. Operators should pay attention to the following points to ensure the agreement is fair and works to their benefit.

  • Does your MDA allow for termination for cause and termination for convenience? In order to keep out of courts and arbitration, this clause is vital. Should an operator decide the partnership is not working out, this condition allows them to serve a 60-day notice of termination.
  • Does your MDA contain fuel surcharges? Fuel surcharges allow distributors to increase prices based on fuel costs. If diesel raises to a certain strike point, the distributor then raises the price on a per-case basis or on the total invoice. These surcharges should be removed or raised to such a point that they will not be implemented.
  • Does your MDA contain an automatic renewal clause? An automatic renewal clause means that, if a distributor is not notified 180 days before the yearly termination of the contract, the MDA is automatically renewed. The operator misses out on the opportunity to renegotiate and may accrue increased fees they are unaware of.
  • Does your contract stipulate when the MDA may be audited, or does it carry an open audit clause? Retaining your rights to regularly audit costs and obtain manufacturer’s paid invoices keeps a distributor “honest.” It’s also important to ensure that these audits may be performed by either an outside party or the operator. Don’t lose this right in your MDA.
  • Does your MDA contain a drop incentive agreement? It is more efficient and less costly for a distributor to drop a larger load than a smaller one. Your costs should go down as well. Make sure your MDA contains an agreement that your product mark-up goes down as drop sizes increase.
  • Does your MDA allow you to release data to a third party or group purchasing organization (GPO)? By releasing data to a GPO, operators receive manufacturer volume allowance funds.

Why Should Restaurant Operators Pay Attention to Their Master Distribution Agreement?

Remaining aware of the many facets of your MDA can greatly affect product costs and limit supply chain disruptions. With regular audits and price comparisons, an operator can stay on top of market fluctuations and ensure their distributor is doing the same. Options included in an MDA can significantly help reduce price volatility. Do you know your distributor’s margin, base price, and backend markup and service costs?

While large leveraged operators may have developed the internal structure to negotiate with broadline distributors, smaller foodservice operators do not carry that same advantage.

Negotiating a proper MDA can require months of complex negotiations. Consolidated Concepts, the leading purchasing partner in the U.S. for restaurants, works with hundreds of brands which allows them to benchmark and compare MDAs. Their software and electronic invoice auditing capabilities as well as their expertise save operators time, money, and potential legal issues.

For more information on this cost-saving strategy, take a look at Consolidated Concept’s Complete Guide to Your Master Distribution Agreement.  

Interested in learning more? Submit the form below and a member of our team will reach out.

The Importance of Restaurants Assessing Master Distribution Agreements (MDAs) in Order to Reduce Costs and Improve Quality

Master Distribution Agreements are the cornerstone for most successful operations in the hospitality industry, at least in terms of optimum pricing and maintaining a solid and reliable supply chain. For restaurants, they provide a strategic and steady cost-saving agreement with their main broadline distributor. Or, at least, that’s what they are designed to do.

Once established, many restaurants maintain the same MDA for years, relying on what has developed into a comfortable relationship with their distributor. Yet this day in, day out, consistent steadiness can, like any relationship that has become somewhat stagnant, end up paralyzing a company’s forward movement and cost operators a percentage of their profits. Experts in procurement, and supply chain analysts, all agree that regular audits and assessments are key to long-term financial health and increased margins.

Here are a few key elements in MDAs that operators should pay attention to:

Contract Timeline

Many MDAs will contain an automatic renewal clause that allows distributors to renew a contract for a year, if they are not notified by the operator within 180 days of the contract termination. Know when your contract ends and take advantage of this opportunity to renegotiate. In addition, contracts that automatically renew often have a clause that allows for cost-of-living increases resulting in increased fees that many operators are unaware of.

When negotiating an MDA, ensure that there is a “no cause exit clause” which allows operators to terminate the agreement with a 60 or 90-day notice.

Auditing

Some contracts will limit the timeframe that a MDA can be audited. It’s important that you maintain the right to audit cost and obtain the actual manufacturer’s paid invoice. Allowances and product discounts should be included in your price. Keep in mind that auditing line-by-line can be extremely time-consuming. A third-party firm, such as Consolidated Concepts, has the software capabilities that make this act effortless, processing and organizing the needed data to accomplish an expert audit readily in real-time.

Drop Incentives

The bigger a load, the better pricing a distributor can normally provide. Make sure that your MDA contains this type of agreement. In essence, it states that as drop sizes increase, your product mark-up decreases. To take advantage of this, consider increasing your size while decreasing your frequency of deliveries with certain types of products.

GPOs

When assessing your MDA, check that it allows you to release data to a third party or Group Purchasing Organization. GPOs give restaurants the combined purchasing power of all of their members and can reduce restaurant costs by up to 30 percent. Dining Alliance is the largest GPO in the industry with a purchasing power of over $10 billion. They also offer a broadline program that includes fixed mark-ups, electronic weekly auditing, and over 350 manufacturer deviations and rebates

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Comparing MDAs

According to Barry Friends, a food industry consultant who spent over 20 years as an executive at three of the top five U.S. foodservice distributors, one of the biggest challenges facing restaurants in relation to MDAs is the lack of supply chain personnel as well as the disruption that can occur when sourcing food and operating supplies from just one broadline distributor. As he describes it, “No matter how much you (the operator) know, the distributors know more; they have all the power, and they are excellent at making their customers feel like they have a great deal.” This “great deal” may be far less than what they can actually offer. While costs are driven by the market, there are options that can be included in a MDA that can help reduce price volatility. What is the distributor’s base price, margin, and backend markup and service costs?

Leveraging an organization that works with hundreds of distributors across the nation, including specialized and smaller organizations, allows experts in the field to compare distribution agreements—an ability that makes a tremendous difference when optimizing a MDA.

As is evident, it takes years of experience in the procurement field to be able to address these types of issues with confidence. Consolidated Concepts helps restaurants by leveraging their expertise in supply chain management, operations, distribution, product management, and spend management, ultimately reducing costs while improving quality. As your business grows so too does the ability to negotiate better pricing. Remaining vigilant when it comes to the agreement with your broadline distributor can dramatically affect product costs.

For more information on this important topic, take a look at Consolidated Concept’s,  A Complete Guide to Your Master Distribution Agreement.

9 of your questions answered: Master Distribution Agreements

Today’s regional and national restaurant and foodservice chains are confronted by a surplus of business and organizational challenges, but none as critical as the direct and indirect impact of purchasing and supply management.

With over 30% of revenues being spent on food supply, restaurant operators are increasing focus and resources on developing more operational and cost-effective ways of purchasing, procuring and managing supply. This trend is the logical outcome of increased managerial concern to meet specific supply objectives of quality, quantity, delivery, price, service, and competitive improvement.

What’s more, negotiations with distributors is receiving increasing emphasis as opposed to competitive bidding, and longer-term contracts or master distribution agreements are replacing short-term buying techniques, placing special emphasis on strategies that ensure short- and long-term value for funds spent.

In an interview with Barry Friends of Technomic, a research and consulting firm servicing the food and foodservice industry, Barry describes the challenges concerning restaurant and foodservice operators, while providing solutions for managing master distribution agreements. Barry spent 24 years in executive leadership roles with three of the top five U.S. foodservice distributors — Sysco, US Foods, and Reinhart — making him uniquely qualified to share his insight on the complex issues associated with distributors and distribution agreements.

Q: What are the biggest challenges facing regional and national restaurant and food service chains when it comes to supply distribution agreements?

Regional and national chains are flooded with distribution related problems. The nature of their problems and challenges vary wildly on their scale, maturity and business model. Most chains are growing, and their problems are growth related — resources — operations — capital. In most cases, growing chains don’t have supply chain resources, they don’t have a supply chain person (department), and if they do it’s cobbled together or it’s a shared role between purchasing and operations.

Consequently, there aren’t a lot of distributors to choose from that can do a great job for growing chains across a large geography. Depending on scale and density, most chains are stuck dealing with broadline distributors — a single window approach for sourcing all food and operating supplies.

However, the most critical issues that supply chains manage is disruption. Bottom line, in order to manage risk and avoid stoppage, the operator surrenders quality, quantity, delivery, price, and service to the distributor, subordinate to the broadliner’s capabilities, transparency, and responsiveness to fluctuating markets.

Moreover, Barry points out that the biggest challenge regarding the operator distributor relationship is that operators “don’t know what they don’t know.”

Barry explains that when “RFPing your business, you will get a number of offers, and you can choose the best one, but no matter how much you (the operator) know, the distributors know more; they have all the power, and they (the distributors) are excellent at making their customers feel like they have a great deal when that it not be the best they can have.”

Q: What factors influence distributor costs?

There are many factors that influence distributor rates, but in most cases operators are not prepared to nor do they have the resources to analyze these influences.

To be clear, distributors do not raise costs, manufactures do. In general terms, costs are driven by the markets. For example, produce costs change daily while meat costs change weekly. Most distributors spreadsheet your supply by category and contract a fixed percent markup on top of their cost.

There are things that can be built into a distribution agreement to help smooth out price volatility, but costs are mainly controlled by the market. Once an operator comes to terms with a distributor, the distributor’s primary focus becomes delivering the service end of the agreement.

Q: When does it become ideal for a chain to start thinking about doing a master distribution agreement?

In short, you should do a distributor agreement as soon as possible.Basically, the moment an account is big enough to command the attention of multiple distributors, is the ideal time to start negotiating a master distribution agreement.

The rule of thumb is if a restaurant or food service chain has a regional and/or national presence, it should be behaving like a chain with regional and/or national authority. The chain should be buying at the very least on an honorable cost plus percent markup agreement, and it should be negotiating special pricing on it’s most important value added items, for example french fries, hamburgers and butter.

As a unit of measure, most of large broadliners like Sysco consider a 5 unit chain and above a “chain account.”

Q: How does an operator analyze whether they are getting a good deal?

Unfortunately, operators really can’t.

Even after operators get their 2 to 3 proposals, at the end of the day, there’s still a margin, and a backend markup that the chains are not privy to. What is the base price? What are the attached backend service costs, and how do you (the operator) analyze and compare? Aside from asking distributors how they make money, the operator is ill prepared and ill equipped to answer these questions.

The best way to know whether you are getting a good deal or not is to leverage the expertise, technology and buying power of Consolidated Concepts — the leading

purchasing partner in the US for restaurants and food service organizations. They work with hundreds of chains which allows them to benchmark and compare one distribution agreement with another.

Q: What’s the difference between a fee per case and percent markup?

Either one is fine. Generally speaking, the distributor will like the percent markup better, and as the product inflates, the distributor’s profit increases. It prevents them from coming back to the operator and saying they need a rate increase because their percent markup will float in respect to inflation.

Commonly, the higher the price volatility, the riskier the security. For example, 15% markup on produce during a tomato shortage can raise the price per case from $25 to

$50. However, either option is still better than autonomous pricing from the DSR (Distributor Sales Representatives).

All in all, it comes down to what the distributor is willing to offer and what you are able to do to rationalize that offer.

Q: What factors should an operator consider when terminating a 3 to 5 year distribution agreement?

Even if the broadliner agreement is sound and the service level is excellent, a chain experiencing significant growth should be checking the validity and currency of their agreement with some regularity. MDA’s have something called an “exit clause,” or common language that says with 60 or 90 day notice, for no cause, the operator can terminate the agreement.

For instance, a 25 unit chain on a 5 year MDA has grown to 50 units in the last 2 to 3 years and has doubled their purchase volume or added a third purchasing volume under their broadliner. In this case, there is no clause that forbids the chain from shopping their current MDA; in fact, Consolidated Concepts highly recommends shopping for new pricing with an agreement currently in place.

Q: What common triggers cause an operator to renegotiate their distribution agreement? What sets them off?

There are many triggers that start the distribution agreement negotiation process. Usually this is triggered by something that causes the operator to lose trust in their incumbent distributor. It could be a matter of price or it could be how the distributor is administered.

Another factor that compels renegotiation is the chains own external state of affairs. Unfortunately, sometimes the problems associated with growing pains transfer to blame on current purchasing practices.

A great example is a 260 unit chain experiencing the pain associated with declining revenues, despite years of loyalty to their distributors, they were urged to turn to Consolidated Concepts for a more innovative solution to reducing purchase spend.

Q: What is compliance and why is it important?

Compliance is designed to add strength to the agreement by assuring that both distributors and customers are adhering to the agreement. For example, if a customer doesn’t pay on time, or is not purchasing at the frequency or volume described by the key performance indicators in the agreement, the distributor has the right to call that customer to the carpet.

In other cases, a red flag may be raised against a distributor who doesn’t call out a customer who is not in compliance with their key performance indicators. For instance, a distributor accepting 100 cases when 150 cases are in the agreement is an indicator that the distributor figured out how to profitize that business to their satisfaction without the 150 cases. This can be a sign that the operator is paying for something they may not be aware of and did not agree on. This is why compliance is important for both sides.

Q: What qualifies a chain to ask for additional incentives?

The number one thing that qualifies a chain to ask for incentives or an improved deal is when a chain starts consistently out performing or overachieving the parameters of their agreement.

An good example of a chain that deserves a better deal is a 10 unit chain (paying cost plus 2 dollars and 40 cents a case with a requirement of 80 cases minimum order and 4 million dollars worth of supply per year) that grows to 15 units (paying 7.5 million dollars a year and 124 cases per order during the term of their agreement. In this case, the operator should reach out to the distributor to negotiate better pricing.

At the end of the day, the distributor will be competitive in situations that make sense. It’s your job as the operator to get the distributor to think of you as a 15-unit chain with 7.5 million dollars in business. They won your business once; make them win it again.

Interested in learning more about Master Distribution Agreements? Download our E-Book below.

Master Distribution Agreement Consolidated Concepts - 2019 EBook

5 potential money siphons hiding in your QSR’s MDA

Most operators who have scaled up to multiple locations have found the benefit of pursuing a Master Distribution Agreement, or MDA, with their main broadline or grocery distributor. This vital contract offers operators the opportunity to lock in pricing terms on their order guide items, and avoid drastic swings in costs and terms from their primary distributors. [Read More] via QSR

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